Wednesday, May 9, 2012
I can’t tell if this is political or accidental, whether it makes me happy or sad or something else.
I find myself at this sort of loss more and more: wanting to safekeep something or report it without knowing what to say.
I don’t know which part of the equation is the problem, but I suspect it has something to do with being constantly prompted to speak, to report on ourselves, on anything. I think it’s closely related to the problem Mike called out last week: that the internet has collapsed the distance between us and our opinions:

We take our arguments seriously, and that is of course a responsible thing to do. Sure, sure. But what about being dumb? What about taking our stupidity seriously?

 As teachers, Kristin and I have been talking about this a lot - the way the college classroom tends to privilege and reward students for how quickly or often they speak, and not just the content of the thought behind that speech. Of course we say there are other ways to participate in class, but in practice we often fall short.  Should we not also (if not only) be rewarding the slow thought that takes its time to form in writing, in revision, in serious stupidity, in dumb silence?
Maybe that’s why I so often feel at a loss in here. The internet* seems ever more like a classroom I’ve just walked into where every single hand is raised.



*and possibly grad school

I can’t tell if this is political or accidental, whether it makes me happy or sad or something else.

I find myself at this sort of loss more and more: wanting to safekeep something or report it without knowing what to say.

I don’t know which part of the equation is the problem, but I suspect it has something to do with being constantly prompted to speak, to report on ourselves, on anything. I think it’s closely related to the problem Mike called out last week: that the internet has collapsed the distance between us and our opinions:

We take our arguments seriously, and that is of course a responsible thing to do. Sure, sure. But what about being dumb? What about taking our stupidity seriously?

As teachers, Kristin and I have been talking about this a lot - the way the college classroom tends to privilege and reward students for how quickly or often they speak, and not just the content of the thought behind that speech. Of course we say there are other ways to participate in class, but in practice we often fall short.  Should we not also (if not only) be rewarding the slow thought that takes its time to form in writing, in revision, in serious stupidity, in dumb silence?

Maybe that’s why I so often feel at a loss in here. The internet* seems ever more like a classroom I’ve just walked into where every single hand is raised.

*and possibly grad school

Monday, April 30, 2012